How to Avoid Brassiness in the Summer: 8 Things Blondes Can Do

Allison Schmidt | 21 March 2017
avoid brassiness on blonde beachy waves.

Going blonde for the summer? Banish brassiness with these insider hair tips.

Summer is on the way and you could say that we are a tad bit excited. Along with soaking up the latest beach reads, rocking flips flops and oversized sunnies, you might also be donning the latest hue of blonde hair. However, this season can be rough on your blonde hair where you might experience unwelcome brassiness, dryness and damage and even green hair (thanks, chlorine!). But that doesn’t mean you can’t a shade of blonde this summer. To help you out, we’re sharing some of our insider tips on how to deal with brassiness the summer and beyond!

Bothered by Brassiness? How to Save Your Blonde Hair this Summer

dealing with brassiness on ashy tone
A darker blonde might be a good option if you don’t want to deal with brassiness. Photo credit: indigitalimages.com

1. Take it down a shade (or two!).

Blondes may have more fun, but brunettes don’t usually deal with brassiness! If those orange-yellow tones are the bane of your summer, try taking your hair color down a few notches. The brighter the blonde, the more obvious brassy tones can be. Just make sure if you are taking your hair darker to pay extra attention to your dyed hair in summer by using color-safe shampoos and conditioners and visiting your colorist.

2. Make your hair more ashy.

Another way to beat warm, brassy tones is to make all of your hair cool toned. An ashy blonde can combat warm tones much easier than a buttery yellow blonde, trust us. You can opt for a simple ashy toner all over or, double up and go for an ashy dark blonde hue.

3. Avoid the sun.

The sun is one of the major culprits in causing your summer brassiness. So, it makes sense that one way to beat it is to avoid the sun! This doesn’t mean you need to stay indoors for the whole season. Nope, just pick up a floppy hat or two to style with your summery sun dresses and shorts! Your (unburnt) shoulders will thank you too.

4. Protect your hair.

Don’t forget to wear a hat in the summer! Hats not only protect your hair from those harsh UV rays but they also look super cute (hey, floppy hat!) that can work for a lazy day at the beach to a brunch with your crew.

5. Lay off the heat.

Heat from the sun can be damaging in and of itself. Just like you don’t want to heat style your hair twice in one go, you don’t want the sun’s heat on top of a heat style. Opt for more heatless curls, or overnight waves during the summer months. The lack of heat styling will help your hair last through summer with less damage.

blonde woman with brassiness on her roots
Avoid those brassy roots. Photo credit: Dvora

6. Wear a cap.

For people who love swimming in pools, you’ll need to watch out for your hair color. We all know that chlorine can mess with blonde hair. Green hair aside, the chemicals can also contribute to damage and dryness. Opt to wear a swim cap (which is a look!) to protect your blonde hair when you get a swim in.

7. Don’t DIY lighten.

Okay, we’ve all been there, by the side of the pool, lemons in hand attempting to lighten our hair. But, especially if you have darker hair it’s basically asking for brassiness. Sure, technically lemon juice might lighten your hair but it’s super drying and won’t give you the same effect that you might be looking for. Trust us, leave it to the professionals, especially during the summer.

8. Tone down brassiness.

When all else fails, you should just opt for brassiness banishing hair products. Used in conjunction with our other tips, you can get through the summer (mostly) unscathed by brassiness. We play favorites when it comes to purple shampoos. We’re especially fond of the Bed Head By TIGI Dumb Blonde Shampoo and Bed Head By TIGI Dumb Blonde Reconstructor. Together, the purple shampoo and conditioner help to combat the yellow color we associate with brassiness.

Need more information about brassiness? Learn all about purple shampoo.

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